Latest developments Soft Drinks


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ONGOING: In May 2017 accounced intention to tax sugary and sweetened drinks. [207] A 19 October 2018 study praised the regulatory efforts taken by Ecuador to tackle the over-consumption of sugary, sweetened beverages.

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ONGOING: Government are in the process of considering a nationwide ‘fat tax’ on junk food.

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ONGOING: As of December 2018, Ministry of Health is considering measures to restrict citizens’ intake of sugar, by considering the introduction of a sugar tax.

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ONGOING: As of 1st January 2018, legislation has introduced a tax on non-alcoholic beverages (carbonated and noncarbonated drinks, 100% juice drinks and sweetened milk drinks).

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ADOPTED: In 2012 a health law was enshrined that put a tax on sweetened drinks and in January 2016, they made it illegal to sell unlimited amounts of drinks with sugar or sweeteners at a fixed price or for free. In July 2018, the Government introduced a tiered-tax rate, progressively increasing to around €20 per hectolitre for products containing more than 11g of added sugar per 100ml.

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ONGOING: Considering a sugar tax, health ministers were unsure it would make it through Parliament. As of April 2018, these plans are on hold in light of a voluntary reformulation plan undertaken by ten firms.

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ONGOING: The Ministry of Health is considering measures to restrict citizens’ intake of sugar, by considering the introduction of a sugar tax and a ban on high-sugar content drinks. If a ban on these drinks were to come into force it would be the first of its kind in the world.

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As of October 2018, Ecuador bans sugary drinks with over ‘7.5g/100ml’ content and has banned the distribution and use of low nutritional quality products in food aid packages.

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New South Wales and Tasmania phase out the sale of sugary drinks and fast junk food at health facilities.